Select the links below for materials appropriate for your specific summer reading.

Arms and the Man

Character Analysis Instructions

Character Analysis Rubric

Introduction-Notes Packet

Literary Analysis Instructions

Pre-Write Web

Shaw Power Point

Theme Instructions

Vocabulary

Arms and the Man

Brave New World

Aldous Huxley Power Point

Allegory HW

Character Analysis Instructions

Character Analysis Rubric

Literary Analysis Instructions

Pre-Write Web

Themes Packets

The Mike Wallace Interview

Vocabulary

Brave New World

 

 

 

Arms and the Man by: George Bernard Shaw

Shaw

Shaw was already a celebrity arts critic and socialist lecturer when he wrote Arms and the Man in 1894. One of Shaw’s earliest attempts at writing for the theatre, it was also his first commercial success as a playwright. Although it played for only one season at an avant-garde theatre, thanks to the financial backing of a friend, it was later produced in America in 1895. Accustomed to the melodramas of the age, however, even sophisticated audiences often did not discern the serious purpose of Shaw’s play. Thus, Shaw considered it a failure.

True success did not come until 1898, when Arms and the Man was published as one of the “pleasant” plays in Shaw’s collection called Plays: Pleasant and Unpleasant, and it subsequently gained popularity as a written work. Included in this collection of plays are lengthy explanatory prefaces, which note significant issues in the plays and which have been invaluable to critics. In place of brief stage directions, Shaw’s plays also included lengthy instructions and descriptions. Another unique aspect of Arms and the Man was its use of a woman as the central character.

Brave New World by: Aldous Huxley

Huxley

Brave New World (1932) is one of the most bewitching and insidious works of literature ever written. An exaggeration? Tragically, no. Brave New World has come to serve as the false symbol for any regime of universal happiness.

 For sure, Huxley was writing a satirical piece of fiction, not scientific prophecy. Hence to treat his masterpiece as ill-conceived futurology rather than a work of great literature might seem to miss the point. Yet the knee-jerk response of "It's Brave New World!" to any blueprint for chemically-driven happiness has delayed research into paradise-engineering for all sentient life.