Mentor High Counselors
Education After High School
Is There No End?












The College Application Process "What you do -- What we do"

Senior Process Program  September 11, 2000

The College Road Map

Locating Information About Colleges

The College Looks At You

The Minimum Core (for 4 or more)

NCAA Clearinghouse Athletic Eligibility

College Preparatory Curriculum Completion Form
 
 


































MENTOR HIGH SCHOOL GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING DEPARTMENT
COLLEGE APPLICATION PROCESS
"What You Do - - What We Do"

Student Should:

    1. check file cabinet in A-19 for instate and out of state applications
    2. Write or call college admissions office
*NOTE: Allow 2-3 weeks when requesting a letter of recommendation. Therefore, student is advised to request these letters before the application is completed.
    1. Bring completed application(s) and check
    2. Complete transcript request card for each application


Counselor Will:
 

    1. Application:  Admission, Financial Aid, Scholarship
    2. Check
    3. Transcript
    4. Teacher and/or Counselor Recommendations
WATCH DEADLINES!   (This includes both the college and Mentor High School)

In general, applications should be sent before our Winter Vacation.  To facilitate the process before winter break, the Unit 12 Office has set the following deadlines:

 December 1, 2000 Applications with Recommendations
 December 15, 2000 Applications without Recommendations

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Senior Process Program  September 11, 2000

Introduction

Two Year College
Requirements/Testing
Four Year College
Requirements/Testing
Senior Process
    Why are we here today?
    1.  Your not different from other seniors
    2.  Time
    3.  Process
What do I need to do now? What is the Application Process ?


What forms do I need for my file and when should they be into the Unit office?


Why?

Because!
Scholarship
Mrs. Fortunato -- The Guidance Office -- Room A-19


Financial Aid -- LEAF

Mentor High School -- Library (Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday)
Loans
Banks
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The College Road Map


The beginning:  Preliminary College Data Collection.

You have already identified at least a few things you would like to experience and learn.  Think abut the kinds of situations in which you learn best and feel most comfortable.  Do you think you can handle large classes, or do you need individual attention?  Do you like doing special projects and independent study, or do you work better in a very competitive environment or are you happier in a more relaxed learning situation?  Do you like being with lots of different kinds of people, or are you more comfortable with people whose interests and abilities are pretty similar to your own?  How you want to learn is just as important a factor as what you want to learn.  Don't forget that learning takes place outside the classroom as well as inside.

There are approximately 3,600 colleges and universities (plus hundreds of vocational and technical schools) in the United States, and no two are quite the same.  Colleges can be:
 
 
 

  • large or small
  • open in their admission or very selective
  • specialized or diversified in their curricula
  • affiliated with a religion or non-sectarian near your home or far away
  • suitable for part-time students or full-time only
  • expensive or low cost
Choosing a college is a very important and very personal decision, but it is not really a matter of life or death.  Personal growth and career preparation can take place in many settings -- not just collegiate ones.  If you do a little advance planning, chances are you will make a pretty good decision in choosing your college.

You should keep in mind that when it comes to college admissions, choosing a college is a two-way street.  Sometimes the decision isn't totally in your hands.  Colleges, especially highly selective ones, have a share in the decision.  Concentrate on identifying several colleges at which you think you would be happy, and for which you think you are reasonably qualified.  Remember that many students end up liking their second, third, or fourth choice college!
 

Senior Year
During the summer months, between the junior and the senior year, you should have visited all of the colleges that are on your list and possibly interview with and admissions officer from each school for more detailed, first-hand information about the colleges.  Don't panic if you did not--visit this fall.

By the beginning of the senior year, you should be able to narrow down your list to at least three to five schools and should send for applications to all of these schools and apply as soon as possible.  A usual "rule of thumb" is that of your three to five schools, the first school should be the dream school, the school that you really want to attend.  The last school on your list should be the one that you will have the least difficulty gaining admission, but still is acceptable as far as you decision making process is concerned.
 

Don't forget to use our "College Links" web page.

 

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Locating Information About Colleges

There are many sources of information that you may use to find out information about colleges and universities across the nation.  Most of those sources of information can be found right here at Mentor High School.  Below are some sources that you may use to help start in your collection of data.
 
  • The College View Computer.  The computer is located in the Guidance Office room A-19 and is a menu driven program that links students to colleges throughout the nation.  It also has the capability for some schools for Internet applications.

  •  
  • The Ohio Career Information System (OCIS computer).  The computer is located in the Learning Center at Mentor High School  and provides a world of information that is updated 3 times a year.

  •  
  • College information on video tape.  Many video tapes with college information are housed in the Guidance Office room A-19.  Theses tapes can be used either during your free time in the Guidance Office.

  •  
  • College Catalogs have a world of information about majors and course selections.  A student can start to get a very solid overview of a college or university from their catalog, but don't be fooled by the pictures.

  •  
  • Let the Internet be your guide.  The Mentor High School Guidance web page has Internet links directly to college or university home pages.  A fast and efficient way of collecting and, sometimes, requesting information concerning schools and majors.  Don't forget to pickup a Internet permission form from the unit office to use the high school computers.  College Links
  • High school faculty.  All of the faculty members of Mentor High School have attended and graduated from at least one and some two and three and four colleges throughout the nation.  Their knowledge and expertise of college and university environments is an excellent source of information about schools.

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The College Looks At You

Your high school record is the best predictor of how well you will do in college.  Colleges review this carefully, not only for your grade point average and rank in class, but also for specific courses you have taken.  As college admission policies range from open to highly selective, you will probably be able to find a college that will admit you.  However, to give yourself a wider choice, you are encouraged to take a challenging program in high school.  Your program should include high-phase English courses, academic mathematics, academic sciences, foreign languages and social studies.

The highly selective colleges will be interested in your extracurricular activities, especially in leadership capabilities which you might have developed.  Remember that you must not only meet their admission's requirements, but that you must excel in one or more areas.  Ask yourself, "How have I distinguished myself from all of the other applicants?"

A personal interview can provide an opportunity for you to present strengths which might not have been included on the application.  It is important for you to take along the information that you have collected about yourself (see the section - Get It Together) organized.  It is also important for you to take along the information that you have supplied on the extracurricular activities list and the college input recommendation sheets that you may have had returned from teachers throughout your high school experience.  All of this data can add strength and credibility to your interview with a college admissions officer.

 Remember, some colleges and organizations have specific requirements.  In the state of Ohio, the minimum core curriculum for high school students that meet the requirements for entrance into all state assisted universities in Ohio is listed below and it is called the minimum core.  (Use the "College Preparatory Curriculum Form" sheet following this page.

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THE MINIMUM CORE


 
4 Credits of English
3 Credits of Mathematics
3 Credits of Science
3 Credits of Social Studies
2 Credits of Foreign Language
1 Credit of Art

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NCAA Clearinghouse
Athletic Eligibility


Core
Division I
Division II
 English
4 years
3 years
 Math 
2 years 
(at the level of Algebra I or above)
2 years
 Science 
2 years 
(including at least one laboratory course)
2 years
(including at least one laboratory course)
 Social Science 
2 years
2 years
 Additional courses in English, mathematics, or natural or physical science
1 year
2 years
 Additional academic courses (in any of the above areas or foreign language, computer science, philosophy, or non doctrinal religion).
2 years
2 years
 Total Core Units Required 
13 
13
"Partial Qualifier"
A "partial qualifier " is eligible to practice with a team at its home facility and receive an athletics scholarship during his or her first year at a Division I school and then has three seasons of competition remaining.

A partial qualifier may earn a fourth year of competition,, provided that at the beginning of the fifth academic year following the student athlete's initial, full-time collegiate enrollment, the student athlete has received a baccalaureate degree.

In order to be classified a "partial qualifier," you have not met the requirements for a qualifier but you're required to:

  • Graduate from high school;
  • Successfully complete a core curriculum of at least 13 academic courses in the appropriate core areas.
  • Present a core course grade point average (based on a maximum of 4.000) and a combined score on the SAT verbal and math sections or a sum score on the ACT based on the partial qualifier index scale.
A "partial qualifier " is eligible to practice with a team at its home facility and receive an athletics scholarship during his or her first year at a Division II school and then has four seasons of competition remaining.

In order to be classified a "partial qualifier," you have not met the requirements for a qualifier but you're required to graduate from High school and meet one of the following requirements:

  • Specified minimum SAT or ACT Scores: or
  • Successful completion of a required core curriculum consisting of 13 core courses and a 2.00 grade point average in the core  curriculum.
"Qualifier
Index"
Division I Qualifier Index
Core GPA
ACT*
sum of scores
SAT+
on or after 4/95
2.500 & +
68
820
2.475
69
830
2.450
70
840-850
2.425
70
860
2.400
71
860
2.375
72
870
2.350
73
880
2.325
74
890
2.300
75
900
2.275
76
910
2.250
77
920
2.225
78
930
2.200
79
940
2.175
80
950
2.150
80
960
2.125
81
960
2.100
82
970
2.075
83
980
2.050
84
990
2.025
85
1000
2.000
86
1010
Division II Qualifier Index
Core GPA
ACT*
sum of scores
SAT+
on or after 4/95
2.000 
or higher
68
or higher
820
or higher
.
Partial Qualifier Index
Core GPA
ACT*
sum of scores
SAT+
on or after 4/95
2.750 & +
59
720
2.725
59
730
2.700
60
730
2.675
61
740-750
2.650
62
760
2.625
63
770
2.600
64
780
2.575
65
790
2.550
66
800
2.525
67
810
* Previously, ACt score was calculated by averaging four scores.  New standards are based on sum of scores.
+ For SAT tests taken on or after April 1, 1995
.
"Non- Qualifier"
A "Non qualifier"  is a student who has not graduated from high school or who has presented neither the core curriculum grade point average and SAT/ACt scores required for a qualifier.

A non qualifier shall not be eligible for regular season competition or practice during the first academic year in residence and then has three seasons of competition remaining.  A non qualifier during the first academic year in residence shall be eligible for non athletics institutional financial sid that is not from an athletics source and is based on financial need only.

A non qualifier may earn a fourth year of competition, provided that at the beginning of the fifth academic year following the student athlete's
initial, full time collegiate enrollment, the student athlete has received a baccalaureate degree.
A student with a diagnosed disability who was not a qualifier may earn a fourth season of competition, provided the student athlete has satisfied procedures and has completed at least 75 percent of his or her degree program at the beginning of the fifth academic year after the student athlete's full-time collegiate enrollment.

A "Non qualifier"  is a student who has not graduated from high school or who has presented neither the core curriculum grade point average and SAT/ACt scores required for a qualifier.

A non qualifier shall not be eligible for regular season competition or practice during the first academic year in residence and then has four seasons of competition remaining.  A non qualifier nay not receive athletics-related aid as a freshman, but may receive regular need based financial sid if the school cretifies that sid was granted with reqard to athletics ability.


 
 
Division III
The above requirements currently do not apply to Division III colleges, where eligibility for financial aid, practice and competition is governed by institutional, conference and other NCAA regulations.

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COLLEGE PREPARATORY CURRICULUM
COMPLETION FORM

                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
Student's Last Name                 First                             Middle                                                             High School
(Please Print)

                                                                                                                                              
Student's Social Security Number                                                                                             City                                 State
 
College Preparatory Areas and Typical Examples
(The minimum core) 
College Preparatory Areas and Typical Examples
(The minimum core) 
9th
Course/Credit
10th 
Course/Credit
11th
Course/Credit
12th
Course/Credit

College Preparatory English
English 9, 10, 11, 12;\
Honors, College, English
Electives
(4 credits)
College Preparatory Mathematics
Algebra 1, Geometry,
Algebra 2, Trigonometry/
Statistics, Calculus,
Math Elective (List level\
Fundamental, Concept, AP)
(3 credits)
College Preparatory Science
(With significant
laboratory experience)
Earth Science, Biology,
Chemistry, Physics,
Science Electives
(3 credits)
College Preparatory
Social Studies
US History, American
Government, Social
Studies Elective
(3 credit)
Foreign Language
(Two units must be in
the same language)
Spanish, French, German,\
Latin, etc.
(2 credits)
he Arts
Art, Fine Art,
Photography, Music
Theatre, Drama
(1 credit)

 
 
 

GET IT TOGETHER
The Step to Organize the Information About You

Take in an envelope all of the following documents and complete this composite form. (Place all of the documents that you have collected that pertain to your college admission such as:  PSAT, SAT, ACT test results, copies of letters of recommendations, correspondence from college, any transcripts, copies of transcripts, etc.
High School Code Number: 363-375

PLAN  Score  Date
PSAT/NMSQT  Score  Date
ACT Score  Date
   Date
SAT I  Score  Date
   Date
SAT II Score  Date
   Date
   Date
Financial Aid (Leaf)  Date

Transcript data:
 9th grade year
  Grade point average
  Class rank

 10th grade year
  Grade point average
  Class rank

 11th grade year
  Grade point average
  Class rank

College Core Information:
 Subjects Will earn through Senior year
 English(4)
 Mathematics(3)
 Science(3)
 Social Studies(3)
 Foreign Language(2)
 Art(1)
Names and addresses of references: Grade Subject
 
 
 

College Major:
College Applications Made:
Name:   Date
Name:   Date
Name:   Date
Name:   Date
Misc. notes:
 
 

STEPS TO VISITING A COLLEGE

1. Call or write to the Admissions Office of the college to make an appointment. 
Try to visit during the week while classes are in session.  Ask to arrange for over night dormitory accommodations.
2. Study the college catalog in advance of your visit and be prepared to ask questions. 
Check the information you have recorded on your College Comparison Chart.
3. Be sure to take a copy of your transcript and test scores with you.
 
 
4. Be prepared to answer questions such as:
 Why do you want to go to college?
 Why are you interested in this college?
 Why are you interested in your selected major?
 What are your academic strengths and weaknesses?
 What extra-curricular activities are of interest to you?
5. Take a campus tour.  Look especially at:
 Dormitories
 Student Center
 Classrooms
 Dining Hall (eat there)
 Library
 Counseling and Health Centers
6. Talk with students and faculty:
 How strong is the department in which you plan to major?
 What kinds of support services are provided?  Counseling, tutoring, job placement, etc.?
 How challenging is the academic program?
 How is the social life?
 What is my chance of acceptance?
7. Remember that you also are making an impression. 
Arrive promptly as scheduled, dress neatly, be prepared, ask questions, and try to relax.  Write a thank you not to the admission representative after your visit.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 

SUGGESTED QUESTIONS TO ASK COLLEGE REPRESENTATIVES

o What is the average GPA of an entering freshman?  ACT or SAT score?
o What is the faculty/student ratio?
o What is the average class size for an introductory course?
o How is your academic calendar year set up?
o How is admission to the college determined?
o Can I have a campus tour?  Sit in on class?  Have lunch in a dining hall?  Stay
 overnight in a dorm?
o When is the application deadline?  Is there a non-refundable deposit?
o What is the school's overall placement rate?  What is it in my intended major?
o What are the school's basic costs (tuition, room, board, and fees)?  What is the estimate
 for books and spending money?
o What kinds of financial aid programs are available?  What forms should I fill out?  By
 when?  Are there any special scholarships offered by the school or its alumni?
o Can I have a car on campus during freshman year?
o What types of college housing are there?  Can I live off campus?
o How many students are there per room?
o What kind of things should I bring to the campus when I move in?
o What varsity sports are played?  Intramural sports?
o Do you award athletic scholarships?
o What kind of extracurricular activities are available?
o What percentage of students are from other states?  Other countries?
o What is the surrounding community like?
o What percentage of students belong to a fraternity or sorority?
o What kind of orientation program is there?  When is it held?
o Will I be assigned a faculty advisor?  How often will we meet?
o What do you consider the school's top three programs?
o What makes this college special?
o What sort of academic reputation does the college have?  How do alumni, business
 people and educators rate it?  Who is the rating dependent upon?
o When do you have to declare a major.  Can a student declare a double or
 interdepartmental major?  If you switch majors, can you find an alternative, attractive
 programs?
o How do the students register for classes?  How often do freshman get courses of their
 choice?
o To what extent will graduate students be used in teaching undergraduates?
o Do students have access to faculty members in an outside of the classroom?
o How have the college graduates done in getting into graduate and professional schools
 and/or getting meaningful employment?
 
 



Writing the College Application Essay

Writing the essay for the college application is often the last snag in a series of paperwork, forms, and other pressures and responsibilities which accompany senior year for college-bound students.  While many students are busy writing research papers, essays and other written reports for class, the application essay is often just another assignment to add on to their list of things to do.

But consider this for a moment:  there is someone about to make a decision which will affect your future.  That someone, an admissions official, is looking at a generic manila folder (one of thousands he may have reviewed).  The folder contains your SAT scores, transcripts (grades, attendance, standardized tests) and perhaps one or two letters of recommendation from a teacher or guidance counselor.

What have you personally contributed to the folder?  The answer should be "the essay."

That folder IS YOU -- a profile on which you are being evaluated for admission.  It is the only picture the admissions official has of you.

 Now ask yourself these questions:

  •  Are my ACT/SAT scores a true reflection of my ability?
  •  Are my grades an indication of my potential and motivation?
  •  Are my letters of recommendation a clear picture of my personality, goals, strengths and weaknesses?
  •  Does anything in my folder indicate my potential for success?


The essay is your opportunity to tell about yourself in your own words -- as you alone perceive your personality, activities, interests, accomplishments and goals.

 

What to Expect

Most essay topics can be classified in four ways:

The Open Ended Topic gives you a great deal of freedom and usually asks that you describe your career, educational and life goals.  Although this topic appears easy to answer at first, the challenge is to prioritize your information and lend structure to your writing.

A second type of essay is the Writing Sample which you may have completed as an English class or creative writing assignment.  It may be a short story, a poem, a report or other written class project.

A third type of essay asks you a Very Specific question.  You may be asked to respond to a recent current event or community development.  Others ask for an autobiographical sketch.  The point is that you are being asked a specific question, so only a specific answer will do -- not a generic essay to be photocopied and mailed to all colleges.

Another type of question uses an Unusual Statement.  You may be asked to share your favorite fantasy or compare yourself to a character in a novel.


 
Steps to follow when writing the essay:

1. Analyze the question.  Know what you are being asked.  Underline or circle key words.  Be aware of limitations set on length.

2. Outline your ideas on paper.  This does not have to be a formal outline.  jot down ideas as they pop into your head.

3. Now go over your rough outline and select ideas and thoughts you want to keep, checking to see that each idea supports your answer.  OMIT those ideas those ideas which do not answer the question.

4. Number the ideas you have selected, deciding which concepts you plan to write about first, second, third, and so on.  This will help you to organize and establish paragraphs.

5. Quickly write a rough draft.  Try to write as you might "say it."  Do not become overly concerned with grammar at this point.  Do not attempt to write a final copy of the first try.  Even the world's greatest writers rarely do that!

6. Re-read and revise looking for these items:

 -- interesting opening statement
 -- ideas grouped by paragraphs and indented
 -- question(s) answered fully
 -- capitalization and punctuation
 -- complete sentences (no fragments or run-ons)
 -- neatness
 -- conclusion or summary


7. If you are uncertain about your own grammar and composition ability, give the essay to someone whom you respect and ask for their suggestions.  You are NOT asking them to rewrite it -- just to assist you with revisions.

8. Write a final copy.  Type or write neatly.  Photocopy if for your files before attaching to your application.  Keeping a photocopy for your records will accomplish two things.  First if you are called by the college for an interview, you will want to review your essay to remind yourself of what is now in your file.  Second, you may need to use the essay again (or part of the essay) to apply to other colleges.

9. Before you mail, ask yourself these final questions:

 -- If I had to read hundreds (thousands, even) of these student essays, is there anything special 
     about mine to set it apart from the rest?
 -- Is there a common thread or focus in my essay?
 -- Does my essay truly reflect my personality?
 -- Does my essay sound sincere, genuine?
 -- Is this essay enjoyable to read?
What to avoid

Finally, there are a few things you should avoid when writing the essay:

 Stick to career and educational plans.  Avoid sensitive topics centering around family such as marriage, divorce, adoption, sibling problems, etc.
 Avoid making excuses for low SAT scores or grades.  The key with this topic (if you must explain) is to show how you have risen above these setbacks and what you plan to do differently in the future.
 o Avoid forced humor, threats to the admission committee, or descriptions of bizarre events.
 o Stress the positive; downplay your weaknesses.

 

What to avoid
Finally, there are a few things you should avoid when writing the essay:

 o Stick to career and educational plans.  Avoid sensitive topics centering around family such as marriage, divorce, adoption, sibling problems, etc.
 o Avoid making excuses for low SAT scores or grades.  The key with this topic (if you must explain) is to show how you have risen above these setbacks and what you plan to do differently in the future.
 o Avoid forced humor, threats to the admission committee, or descriptions of bizarre events.
 o Stress the positive; downplay your weaknesses.
 

THE APPLICATION PROCESS
A MAJOR STEP

 Review your high school record.  Check your college comparison chart and narrow your choices to several colleges.  Make sure you can meet the minimal admission requirements of the colleges of your choice.  Now you are ready to apply.  Try to get an old copy of a college application to practice on or make a photocopy of an original to practice on.

1. The Guidance office in room A-19 frequently has applications for local colleges.  however, you may need to write a letter to the Director of Admissions of the colleges of your choice no later than October of your senior year.  Many students are writing to the colleges during the summer between their Junior and senior year to request the applications.  Most colleges and universities have home pages and you can request an application right from a school Internet computer (make sure you have your release form signed).  At this time, request specific information on financial aid, housing, honors programs, special programs or special interests, as well as a general application for admission.

2. Your application should be filled our completely, neatly, and intelligently: follow all instructions carefully.  Include any application fee that is required.  If an essay is required, you may want to ask an English teacher to review it.  List both a first and second choice of major and if you are "undecided" it is not a "strike against you" if you list it.

3. Even if an interview is not required, it may be advantageous to arrange for a personal interview with an admission officer.

4. Be sure that you apply to at least one college which you are sure will accept you.

5. Housing and financial aid usually require separate applications and may have an earlier deadline than the general application.

6. Most colleges require references.  Before giving any person's name as a reference, ask her/his permission.  Provide a stamped, addressed envelope with the recommendation form, both as a matter of courtesy and in order to assist your references in being prompt.  Provide sufficient time and then check back to assure that the recommendation has been mailed.  Hint:  You may want to have a prepared list of extracurricular activities, qualifications, and special courses you have taken which could aid in writing a recommendation for you.

7. Most colleges require a transcript (photocopy of all high school courses and grades) as part of the admission process.  In as much as your counselor will be pressing your application to college , you must complete a "Request Card" and give it with your application to your counselor.  All Colleges require that a final transcript  be sent.  It is the student's responsibility to request these from the guidance office.  Mentor High School provides three transcripts free of charge.

8. Most colleges notify you of acceptance in April or May and require an "acceptance reply date" before the end of May.  It is important to observe this deadline.  Each college that accepts you should be notified of your decision.  Frequently a non-refundable deposit must accompany your acceptance.
 

MENTOR HIGH SCHOOL GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING DEPARTMENT
COLLEGE APPLICATION PROCESS
"What You Do - - What We Do
 

Student Should:

 Obtain college application:

o Check file cabinet in A-19 for in-state and out-of-state
o Write or call college admissions office

 Distribute to teacher or counselor recommendation form - (teachers  will return the letter of recommendation to the appropriate counselor)*NOTE: Allow 2-3 weeks when requesting a letter of recommendation. Therefore, student is advised to request these letters before the application is completed.

 Complete admission application, college's financial aid information form, and scholarship application, if appropriate, neatly, following directions.

 Make appointment with counselor:

o Bring completed application(s) and check
o Complete transcript request card for each application

Counselor Will:

 Review completed application and other forms.

 Prepare transcript with test scores.

 Write letter of recommendation if required.

 Mail complete package in profile folder:

o Application:  Admission, Financial Aid, Scholarship
o Check
o Transcript
o Teacher and/or Counselor Recommendations

WATCH DEADLINES!   (This includes both the college and Mentor High School)

In general, applications should be sent before our Winter Vacation.  To facilitate the process, the Unit 12 Office has set the following deadlines:

 December 1, 1997 Applications with Recommendations
 December 15, 1997 Applications without Recommendations
 
 

AUTOBIOGRAPHY


Name____________________________________________ Class of __________
 

The responsibility of your counselor in helping to prepare the "Secondary School Report" is to provide an overview of your academic and extra-curricular achievements and also a sense of your promise for further intellectual and personal growth.  Because it is important to convey something of the unique quality that makes you "you," the counselor needs your estimate of yourself and what you have done.  Please take the time to think about who you are and where you are headed.  Incorporate experiences and activities drawn from any part of time in your life.  Please answer as completely as possible.

It is a good idea to make a duplicate copy to assist you in writing your college applications.

Your Education

 1. What are your academic interests?  What might you like to study in college?
 
 
 
 

 2. Which courses have you enjoyed most?  Why?
 
 
 
 

 3. Which courses have been most difficult for you?  Why?
 
 
 
 

 4. What do you consider the best measures of your potential college level work (consider grades, levels of courses taken, test scores (PSAT, ACT, SAT)?
 
 
 
 

 5. Are there any outside circumstances (in your recent experience or background) which have interfered with your academic performance?  Consider such factors as:  excessive school activities,  home responsibilities or difficulties, after-school job, illness or emotional stress, parental pressure, or other factors.
 
 
 
 

 6. Name and describe the book(s) you have read in the last 12 months (not the books assigned in school).
 

 Your Activities and Interests

 7. List, IN ORDER OF IMPORTANCE TO YOU, the honors, prizes, or awards you have received.
 
 

 8. What work experience do you have?
 
 

 9. What activities do you most enjoy outside the daily routine of school?
 
 

10. Have you traveled or lived in different localities?  Where?  Comment on any significant travel experiences.
 
 

The World Around You

11. What do your parents and friends expect of you?  How have their expectations influenced the goals and standards you set for yourself?
 
 

12. What person (current or historical) do you most admire?  Why?
 
 
 

Your Personality and Relationships With Others

13. What do you consider your greatest strengths?
 
 

14. What do you consider your greatest weaknesses?
 
 

15. List five words that you would use to describe yourself and why.
 
 

16. How have you grown or changed during your high school years?
 
 

17. Is there other information that will be useful in making an accurate appraisal of you for college admission (unusual circumstances in school or at home which may have affected you)?
 
 









PARENT "BRAG SHEET" FOR
COLLEGE RECOMMENDATION


 


Name of Student:
 

1. What do you consider to be your child's outstanding accomplishments  during the past three or four years?  Why did you select these as most  important?
 
 
 
 
 

2. In what areas has your child shown the most development and growth  during the past three or four years?
 
 
 
 
 

3. What do you consider to be his/her outstanding personality traits?
 
 
 
 
 

4. If you had to describe your son/daughter in five adjectives, what would they be?
 
 
 
 
 

5. Are there any unusual or personal circumstances that have affected your child's educational or personal experiences?
 
 
 
 
 

Please feel free to use a second sheet of paper if your comments do not fit into the space provided.
 
 
 

 Name of Counselor Parent Signature
 5125.1
FORM E
MENTOR PUBLIC SCHOOLS
PUPIL INFORMATION RELEASE FORM
(PLEASE PRINT)
 

Name ___________________________________________SS # ____ - ___ - _____
  Last               First            MI              (Maiden)

Address ________________________________ Yr. of graduation or Yr. last attended

 ________________________________ ____________________
 

I hereby authorize the Mentor Public Schools to forward the following information:

 Circle YES or NO for each item

 1. Grades in courses YES NO
 2. Attendance YES NO
 3. Achievement test data YES NO
 4. Aptitude test data YES NO
 5. Mental ability data YES NO
 6. College entrance test data YES NO
 7. Character reference YES NO
 8. List of extracurricular activities YES NO
 9. Honors/Awards YES NO
10. Health records YES NO

11. Other (please specify) ___________________________________________
 

I grant Mentor Public Schools permission to forward the above information for legitimate reasons:

A. To colleges YES NO
B. To prospective employers YES NO

C. Other (please specify) ___________________________________________
 

These records are to be forwarded to:

 Name __________________________________________________________

 Address __________________________________________________________

 City ______________________________ State ________ Zip ________
 

EXPIRATION DATE:  Before a student reaches 18 years of age, this form must be signed by a parent.  When a student reaches 18 years of age, he must sign a new form, designating the information he wishes released.

___________________ ___________________________________________
 Date Signature of Parent/Guardian or
  Student 18 years of age
8/5/77
Revised 7/2/84
 5/9/88

 EMPLOYER/ADVISOR/COACH REFERENCE

Student's Name _______________________________________ Grade:_____

Advisor/Coach's/Employer's Name __________________________Date:_____

Activity/Sport ___________________________________________________

A recommendation is being requested for the above student as part of his/her college application.  You are being asked to provide any information or insights about your experiences with the student that could be beneficial to his/her application effort.  Please offer VERY SPECIFIC DATA to assure that his/her recommendation will be meaningful.

1. Length of time you've known student._________________ In What Capacity?________
 ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

2. What is the extent of student's participation in this extra-curricular activity?  (Please comment on past and present involvement) ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

3. Has the student held a leadership position in this activity? _____

 Position ____________________
 Length of time _______________
 Contributions__________________________________________________
 ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

4. Please comment on students' personal qualities:  Consider motivation, creativity, initiative, dedication, maturity, ability to interact with others, energy, reaction to setbacks, self discipline, self confidence, sense of humor, concern for others.  Give as many specific examples as possible.

 ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

5. Has this student received any honors/awards as a result of participating in this activity?  (Ex.: varsity letter, thespian, community recognition)._________
 ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

6. Cite any praiseworthy project, leadership role or accomplishment by this student.
 __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
7. Additional comments:_____________________________________________
 ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
 
 
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